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STEM CELL THERAPY FAQ

 

1. Will you give a brief history of stem cell therapy?

Stem cell therapy has been around for a long, long time. We now know every organ in the body
has stem cells which means skin grafts, bone marrow transplants, and heart transplants are all
forms of stem cell therapy. Blood transfusions, done as early as World War I, are a form of stem
cell therapy.

2. Where do the human umbilical cord stem cells come from?

The human umbilical cord stem cells are collected from hospitals across the United States. The
mother signs a consent form, donating the umbilical cord blood to the hospital. Only cord blood
cells from healthy mothers and babies are accepted. These are pure cells, fully tested, with no
chemicals added. They are basically washed, rinsed, and then frozen.

3. Where do you see the future of stem cell therapy going?


The future is bright! We are seeing stem cell therapy reduce pain and improve the quality of life for
so many. There are many diseases we have not been able to treat in the past; stem cell therapy is
beginning to shed light on many incurable diseases. We are seeing remarkable results in inherited,
genetic, environmental, and lifestyle diseases. Stem cell therapy can help people live a longer,
healthier, pain-free life. We are very optimistic about the future of stem cell therapy in all areas. It
is a game changer.

4. Are there any side effects of human umbilical cord therapy?


In a very small percentage of our patients, we occasionally see a minor reaction of flu-like
symptoms. This does not last more than 24 to 48 hours maximum. Actually, we like to see this
because it demonstrates the cells’ anti-inflammatory and immune-privilege potential.

5. How do you verify stem cell count?

We have a Flow Cytometry machine that counts the viable cells and we also have a third-party lab
testing that verifies.


6. Where are the stem cells grown?

We don’t grow the stem cells. It is not legal to grow stem cells. FDA guideline is they must be
minimally manipulated. Our process is to minimally manipulate, which means we spin the cord
blood, collect the buffy coat, count the cells, test them, separate the cells, and then freeze them.

7. Do they multiply in the human body; and is there research that shows this process?

Yes, they do. There are studies that show this process through the use of dyes in the cells. The
research follows the cells as they divide. This is continually researched and evaluated. On average,
it shows every 28 hours for 65 generations. These will differentiate ongoing, and the T-cells will
then clean them up. They are transient cells that come in, clean up, and then get out of the way.


8. Can you prove the viability of the cells in each vial?

Yes, we have documentation per vial. Each vial is counted with a Flow Cycometer and frozen with a
viable count of approximately 5 million live active viable stem cells.


9. Are there any contraindications to a patient receiving stem cells?

In a very small percentage of our patients, we occasionally see a minor reaction of flu-like
symptoms. This does not last more than 24 to 48 hours maximum. Actually, this could be beneficial
because it demonstrates the cells’ anti-inflammatory and immune-privilege potential.


10. Is there any risk of transferring DNA in stem cell therapy?

Absolutely not, this is not scientifically possible. There cannot be a transfer of DNA through stem
cells.


11. Who is a candidate for this treatment?

Anyone who desires to improve their health and practice prevention can benefit from the
powerful anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory aspects of HUCT stem cell therapy.


12. Is this FDA approved?

The FDA does not approve or disapprove this process. They do set guidelines to follow. The process
of our stem cells meets all of the FDA current guidelines. Our labs and tissue banks are overseen by
the FDA, the National Institute of Health, the American Association of Tissue Banks and the
American Association of Blood Banks. We have an on-staff expert in regulatory affairs who stays
current and oversees all regulatory guidelines.